Skip to Content, Skip to Navigation
Advertisement

Safeguard OSH Solutions - Thomson Reuters

Safeguard OSH Solutions - Thomson Reuters



Safeguard Magazine

Red carpet report

Six hundred people packed into the room for this year’s awards. PETER BATEMAN was there and scribbled these notes on a napkin.

MC Michèle A’Court’s TV past caught up with her when, late in proceedings, a man onstage to support an award-winner called across to her at the other podium – “Michèle,What Now?” – and regaled her with an impromptu poem-pun which riffed on Hawke’s Bay winery names and ended with, well, some kind of proposal.

Earlier, some diners swore it was Marilyn Monroe herself who sashayed down the red carpet to pick up an award, while shortly afterwards our MC professed to be amazed that Sir Ian McKellan himself had been up on stage to present an award, possibly confusing Vitae board chair Peter Barnett with the ex-wizard. It was that kind of evening.

“Holy shit!” announced one early winner, explaining that in construction people swear a lot, “because swearing makes everything better”. Hell, yes.

Fonterra award presenter Julio Rodriguez stood at the podium and beamed. “Our currency is human life, how cool is that? I love my job!” Big cheers. Could be a good line to recall next time someone asks you what you do. “What do I do? Glad you asked. Actually, my currency is human life!” Hmm … on second thoughts, out of context, that could be misinterpreted.

Mark Babbington from Napier Port provided an interesting insight on the port’s drive to be the safest in the country. “Hawke’s Bay is a small community. Our kids go to school together, play sport together. We want to make sure we keep everyone safe who comes onto our port.”

Richard Griffiths, accepting an award on behalf of Staylive, walked down the red carpet to an appropriate Bee Gees tune, because who doesn’t enjoy a good aural pun? “If a really competitive industry like the power sector can get together and encourage good practice,” he said, “then anyone can.”

Joanne Thompson, winner of the H&S rep category, said she would like to share her award “with all the safety reps out there”, a sentiment echoed by the minister, Iain Lees-Galloway. “Being a safety rep is an incredible role and it is central to what we are trying to achieve,” he told the crowd at the end of the evening.

Lifetime achievement award recipient Sandra Johnstone confessed she had harangued a good few health & safety managers over the years about acknowledging mental health as part of their brief, but remained unapologetic. “Harm occurs up here too,” she said, hand on head.

She recalled that towards the end of months spent in Christchurch post-earthquake her team presented her with a vivid purple t-shirt with the phrase “Not quite munted” on the front. “Well, this not quite munted woman is seeking permission to change the international manual of trauma response to take account of the culture of New Zealand, and to plant the seed for a national trauma team to stand alongside our fantastic first responders.” Cheers all round, and a waiata from her supporters in the audience.

An earlier waiata had come from the stage after the delegation from Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu had received their award, with Matapura Ellison noting that “looking after people is innate to us as Māori”.

Finishing the evening, Unitec’s Mary Johnston said their initiative had involved “a lot more than just the card reader” as it was part of a journey over the last couple of years. “Thanks to all the people who have taken it seriously at Unitec to keep our students safe and so they can go out knowing what good safety looks like.”

And what a great sentiment to end with!

KENSINGTON SWAN BEST INITIATIVE TO ADDRESS A SAFETY RISK

THE FINALISTS:

METRO PERFORMANCE GLASS

  • • 
    Lifting or placing packs of glass onto racking is a serious risk and there had been several incidents each year.
  • • 
    The company implemented a safety zone system and designed an engineered roller arm and wheel brackets to ensure the pack lifter’s metal feet are clear of the glass on exit.
  • • 
    Since then, there have been no pack lifter incidents and another glass company is keen to adopt this new method.

NAYLOR LOVE CONSTRUCTION

  • • 
    The use of swinging stages on high rise buildings introduces the risk of objects falling through the gap between stage and building façade.
  • • 
    An engineered angle bracket system was designed to be fixed onto a swinging stage platform, so that any material dropped would be deflected within the stage rather than falling.
  • • 
    On a large project with ten swinging stages in use there were no drop incidents.

THE SUPPLY CHAIN/COUNTDOWN

  • • 
    Distribution centre staff acknowledged cutting corners and said major risk safety rules needed to be simplified and better communicated.
  • • 
    Catchy safety rules were developed and two staff from each DC featured as made-up accident victims in high-impact posters, videos and billboards for the launch.
  • • 
    The “Safe Shift Every Shift” programme has helped achieve a 42% reduction in LTIFR and a 15% increase in near misses reported.

THE WINNER: Naylor Love Construction

The project was located in downtown Auckland in an area of high pedestrian movement. The solution can be applied to any swinging stage at a time when the construction of high rise apartments is booming. The judges appreciated the simplicity of this solution, and that it eliminated the risk.

WORKSAFE NEW ZEALAND BEST INITIATIVE TO ADDRESS A HEALTH RISK

THE FINALISTS:

AIR NEW ZEALAND

  • • 
    Created an initiative to help staff when they have pain or discomfort below the threshold of an injury.
  • • 
    Staff who report pain related to manual handling can be referred to a physiotherapist, focusing on a home exercise programme while still at work.
  • • 
    This early intervention has been embraced by staff and managers and has promoted open conversations.

UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO

  • • 
    Rodents used in teaching and research produce proteins which can cause Laboratory Animal Allergy in staff and students.
  • • 
    Individually ventilated and vented cages were introduced, as well as downdraft stations for open-top cages, and P2 masks for people in the lab.
  • • 
    Environmental monitoring now detects no allergens around the cages, and blood tests of the most exposed staff show a reduction in allergens detected.

WESTPAC NEW ZEALAND

  • • 
    The old approach to asbestos was to manage it only as it was discovered by building contractors.
  • • 
    All 200 buildings were assessed and the location of asbestos and other hazardous materials logged into an online database accessible by contractors.
  • • 
    The online portal highlights areas of highest risk in each building, and Hazmat decals have been applied to all identified surfaces.

THE WINNER: AIR NEW ZEALAND

The judges appreciated the recognition that manual handling is not a critical risk, but is the most widespread cause of injuries and needs to be actively addressed. The “Take Charge” programme has empowered people to intervene early to protect their own health. The average days lost to a manual handling injury has fallen from 15 to 8.

VITAE BEST INITIATIVE TO PROMOTE BETTER WORKER HEALTH

THE FINALISTS:

LION

  • • 
    A staff survey revealed 6% of staff with anxiety issues and 4% with depression.
  • • 
    The “Best ME” initiative was launched to reduce the stigma around mental health, and to encourage open conversations.
  • • 
    Having “Best ME” chats has become part of the culture, and nearly one third of staff development goals are now wellbeing-related.

MARS PETCARE NEW ZEALAND

  • • 
    More than one third of its 180 staff were smokers, so the “Be Well” programme was introduced with an eye to eventually going smoke-free.
  • • 
    In the first year nearly 50 staff took part in health appraisals and an 8-week challenge, and a Portacom building was re-purposed as a place for relaxation and health checks.
  • • 
    In the second year participation increased significantly, and a committee of mainly smokers worked on going smoke-free, which has now been achieved.

WELLINGTON CITY COUNCIL

  • • 
    The previous wellbeing strategy did not align with WorkSafe’s Healthy Work document, with its proactive management of health risks and its acknowledgment of the effects of health on work.
  • • 
    The new strategy has four action areas covering nutrition/activity; mental wellbeing; musculoskeletal health; and smoking, drugs & alcohol use.
  • • 
    Staff are first engaged in the strategy during regular meetings with their manager, with a self-assessment tool as the basis for ongoing conversations.

THE WINNER: WELLINGTON CITY COUNCIL

The judges appreciated the rigorous focus on risk behind the new health & wellbeing framework, and the equal weight placed on preventive and proactive measures. Resources help guide staff and managers in having conversations about health & wellbeing to help monitor progress and guide the next step. Experiments with innovative ways of engaging people has been encouraged and the programme has been modified accordingly.

NZ SAFETY BLACKWOODS BEST INITIATIVE TO ENCOURAGE WORKER INVOLVEMENT IN HEALTH & SAFETY

THE FINALISTS:

AIR NEW ZEALAND

  • • 
    The airline’s many health & safety representatives were enthusiastic but lacking in direction.
  • • 
    30 reps were brought together and used the company’s High Performance Engagement method to work out how to better attract, support and develop health & safety reps.
  • • 
    The reps now feel they are part of an empowered community who help fellow workers identify issues and to collaborate on finding solutions.

COMVITA

  • • 
    Safety across business units both in New Zealand and abroad was inconsistent and often viewed as not relevant to the needs of particular operations.
  • • 
    The company worked with staff to develop its own safety maturity measurement tool and set global targets.
  • • 
    The process has engaged and empowered staff to seek improvements relevant to their own risk profile and work environment, and by doing so has helped to decentralise safety and build trust.

CONNETICS

  • • 
    Surveys revealed an underlying culture of low trust, passivity, and waiting to be told what to do.
  • • 
    The company asked people about work-as-imagined vs work-as-done, and used that input to tackle engagement and trust more broadly, not just around safety.
  • • 
    Initiatives arising from this work include incident learning teams, worker engagement groups, and a co-design approach to resolving issues.

THE WINNER: CONNETICS

The judges appreciated the courage it took to move from a centralised control model to a “Leader as host” philosophy, which acknowledges the best solutions can only come with input from everyone. Staff now request feedback from incident learning teams even if they were not involved in the incident, while workshops have generated large numbers of suggestions.

3M BEST USE OF NEW ZEALAND DESIGN/TECHNOLOGY TO ELIMINATE OR ISOLATE A RISK

THE FINALISTS:

IMG LTD

  • • 
    During maintenance shutdowns, accretion needs to be removed from an afterburner, a 100-hour task for two people.
  • • 
    An injury prompted the design and building of a remote-controlled digger to do the job, which was trialled over several shutdowns.
  • • 
    The digger eliminates the need for confined space entry and reduces the time taken by 75 percent.

SILVER FERN FARMS

  • • 
    A plant was destroyed when a contractor caused a fire between poly panels. Such fires spread unseen and even when detected are difficult to put out.
  • • 
    The “Hawera spike” was invented by two staff to help extinguish the early stages of a fire by piercing the panel and flushing water between both sides.
  • • 
    Many prototypes were developed until an effective device emerged, which can be used in any commercial building or plant which uses poly panels.

UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

  • • 
    The new trade school building is open plan and contains 150 high risk machines for students to train on. Most students are inexperienced on the types of machine they need to use.
  • • 
    A “Do it Safe” automated card reader system was introduced to control each student’s access to each machine they need to work on.
  • • 
    Each student has to go through an induction, watch a video, and pass an online test before their access card is activated.

THE WINNER: UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

The judges appreciated the amount of research and collaboration that went into the development of this access control system. The process has significantly reduced risks around training and competency in the use of high risk machinery.

SITE SAFE BEST HEALTH AND SAFETY INITIATIVE BY A SMALL BUSINESS

THE FINALISTS:

BPM

  • • 
    This project management consultancy identified the need for a staff wellbeing programme.
  • • 
    In 2017 it developed a trial six-week programme suitable for a small business, encompassing nutrition, movement, sleep, hydration, meditation, and community.
  • • 
    The trial was so successful that all staff went on to set goals for 2018 covering fitness, mental health, and personal aims, on the basis that no one can be good at their job if their job is all they do.

FOCUS CONSTRUCTION GROUP

  • • 
    With 40 staff and a labour force of mostly contractors, the company was working on a big contract when it identified 8 risk elements which had become normalised as being “acceptable risks”.
  • • 
    It created its own safety brand, SWER, supported with visual icons as a way of focusing attention on the 8 risks.
  • • 
    Breaches involving these risks have fallen dramatically during site audits over the last six months.

STEELPIPE

  • • 
    This heavy engineering firm had a near miss when a pipe rolled off a pack being prepared for transport and narrowly missed staff, who said “we didn’t have our safety radar switched on”.
  • • 
    So, RADAR was developed as an acronym and brand to improve situational awareness and risk assessment via posters, toolbox talks and team meetings.
  • • 
    Use of a new RADAR topic each month has seen event reporting more than double, and culture surveys show it has lifted staff engagement.

THE WINNER: FOCUS CONSTRUCTION GROUP

The judges applaud the creation of a distinctive health & safety brand, something usually only attempted by much larger organisations. Since the brand has been introduced, reports of unsafe conditions and behaviours have more than doubled and clients report much improved safety management on site.

IMPAC BEST COLLABORATION BETWEEN PCBUs

THE FINALISTS:

HAWKINS

  • • 
    The Auckland Council’s headquarters building, located in a high pedestrian zone, required major façade maintenance.
  • • 
    Working closely with the Council, Hawkins took a rigorous Safety in Design approach and held multiple risk workshops with consultants and subcontractors.
  • • 
    Hawkins adopted engineering controls such as mast climber platforms, a cantilevered hanging scaffold and catch deck, and solid non-flammable hoardings around the base.

NAPIER PORT

  • • 
    With 750+ PCBUs working at the port, and a rise in vessel numbers, a more formal method was needed to safely coordinate activities.
  • • 
    The port now convenes a pre-vessel meeting and invites all PCBUs involved in loading/unloading, as well as those in the vicinity of the work, to attend.
  • • 
    The lead stevedore proposes a plan and all other PCBUs give their input, with alerts widely disseminated so risks are understood.

SOUTHERN RESPONSE & ARROW INTERNATIONAL

  • • 
    The volume of repair work on houses damaged in the Canterbury earthquakes produced widespread dissatisfaction at the conventional style of safety reporting.
  • • 
    Workshops involving many small residential contractors identified 8 critical risks and saw a move to risk-based safety reporting.
  • • 
    The new focus on risk saw steady improvement, prompted stronger ownership of safety, and boosted relationships between many PCBUs.

THE WINNER: NAPIER PORT

The judges liked how the pre-vessel meetings have built strong and enduring relationships between multiple PCBUs, particularly since ports are notoriously challenging work sites. The meetings have lifted accountability for managing risks and have built a real sense of family, which has created opportunities for identifying productivity improvements too. Vehicle incidents at the port have declined by 75% in a year.

SIMPSON GRIERSON BEST BOARD LEVEL ENGAGEMENT IN HEALTH AND SAFETY

THE FINALISTS:

NEW ZEALAND POST

  • • 
    Legislation change prompted a new approach called “Safe Home Every Day”, with a strong focus on engagement in health & safety, from the board down.
  • • 
    The Board used the IoD framework to help focus on 9 critical risks, and to have board members regularly in the field to observe work and talk with staff.
  • • 
    When a serious issue arose with the new Paxster vehicles the board moved rapidly to take them out of service until the problem was resolved, prioritising the safety of people over service delivery.

SIMCOX CONSTRUCTION

  • • 
    The new legislation saw the creation of a board health & safety charter and the presence of a board member at the monthly health & safety committee meeting.
  • • 
    A board member attends the company’s monthly all-staff meeting at which safety is the major item, to speak about safety trends and give feedback to staff for their good actions.
  • • 
    The board chair conducts a monthly safety audit of one aspect of the firm’s operations and reports back to the board.

TE RŪNANGA O NGĀI TAHU

  • • 
    The 18 elected members of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu lacked visibility of the key risks faced by 200 staff.
  • • 
    An incident report triggered the creation of a board health & safety charter and much improved reporting of health & safety.
  • • 
    A new health & safety strategy focuses on operational excellence, a wellbeing culture, and visible leadership.

THE WINNER: TE RŪNANGA O NGĀI TAHU

The judges appreciated Te Rūnanga’s acknowledgment that in 2016 it was in a situation of “unconscious incompetence” with regards to health & safety. Emotional wellbeing and cultural safety have been included in the top ten risks facing people, and now make up 17% of incidents reported. Board reporting now reflects the true risk profile of the organisation’s wide variety of work activities.

ACC BEST LEADERSHIP OF AN INDUSTRY SECTOR OR REGION

THE FINALISTS:

GOVERNMENT HEALTH & SAFETY LEAD

  • • 
    Many state sector agencies were finding it difficult to recruit health & safety professionals.
  • • 
    An interns programme was created to promote a career in health & safety to senior tertiary students in related fields, and to showcase the public sector as a desirable place to work.
  • • 
    74 students applied and 9 were placed with public sector agencies over the summer. Some have been offered jobs, and all would recommend the programme to other students.

NAPIER PORT

  • • 
    The port has built a mentoring relationship with the operator at Fiji’s Suva and Lautoka ports, which suffered poor safety, productivity and culture.
  • • 
    Crane operators and managers from the Fijian ports have taken part in the Crane and Culture Excellence Programme launched in 2017, including use of the crane simulator.
  • • 
    Productivity has risen and incidents have declined at the Fijian ports, which have used this training opportunity to transform their safety culture overall.

STAYLIVE

  • • 
    Formed in 2011, this electricity generation and supply sector group was created to improve health & safety in the sector and to ensure better consistency of practice.
  • • 
    It has developed guidelines on multiple topics and runs numerous working groups on issues as they come up.
  • • 
    It has recently created a website to enable wider sharing of its resources, safety alerts, and the latest moves of each of its working groups.

THE WINNER: STAYLIVE

The judges appreciated the backing for the Staylive model at the governance level of their members, which lends the group the authority to design changes and have them implemented across the industry. Staylive’s example of serious sector collaboration could serve as useful model for other high risk industries yet to grapple collectively with health & safety.

NZISM HEALTH AND SAFETY PRACTITIONER OF THE YEAR

THE FINALISTS:

MATT SADGROVE (HEALTH & SAFETY MANAGER, DELTA UTILITY SERVICES)

  • • 
    Used the opportunity of organisational change to engage with management and board to develop new thinking on health & safety.
  • • 
    Visited work sites to show employees and contractors early drafts of a new strategy and seek their input. The resulting strategy is now owned by everyone.
  • • 
    Under media scrutiny, engaged with everyone to help transform a challenging pole replacement project into a productive and safe success.

SANDY LOWE (HEALTH & SAFETY COORDINATOR, TARARUA DISTRICT COUNCIL)

  • • 
    Transformed health & safety in the council from a box-ticking “have to do it” to an enthusiastic “want to do it”.
  • • 
    Engaged with everyone from chief executive to field staff, such that membership of the health & safety committee is now seen as a privilege for which people eagerly stand for election.
  • • 
    Engaged with all regular contractors large and small, and has overcome the resistance of smaller ones by helping them develop their health & safety plans.

TERRI COOPLAND (HEALTH, SAFETY & ENVIRONMENT MANAGER WITH MARS PETCARE NEW ZEALAND)

  • • 
    In 2016 health & safety performance had reached a plateau, so Terri developed a behavioural methodology called “Take 2” to supplement the existing approach.
  • • 
    Take 2 has challenged everyone to consider their personal responsibilities and has been embraced enthusiastically.
  • • 
    It has also helped to engage staff and build a sustainable health & safety culture.

THE WINNER: TERRI COOPLAND

Terri’s Take 2 initiative has been so successful it has caught the attention of the Mars company worldwide. Terri is now working with external organisations to take the concept into the wider community.

EDENFX HEALTH & SAFETY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR

THE FINALISTS:

DALLAS MCLEOD (SILVER FERN FARMS)

  • • 
    A trainer at the Waitotara plant who sits on Ora Rūnanga, the company’s health & safety governance group.
  • • 
    His mana, knowledge of tikanga and communication skills have been instrumental in developing better communications channels between management and staff.
  • • 
    His mentoring of new health & safety reps and his ability to build rapport with all staff have helped to change the plant’s safety culture for the better.

JOANNE THOMPSON (COCA-COLA AMATIL NEW ZEALAND)

  • • 
    A member of the manufacturing team, who was challenged during a literacy training course to identify a problem and propose a solution.
  • • 
    Identified poor and inconsistent markings in the plant to keep forklifts and pedestrians separate, and proposed a solution involving barriers and better communications.
  • • 
    Also involved in creating a safety induction video for new starters and contractors.

JUDITH COLLETT (WHANGAREI DISTRICT COUNCIL)

  • • 
    An administrator in the roading department, which is part of a joint venture involving NZTA and three other councils. She is the lead rep in the JV.
  • • 
    Has completed the Level 6 Health & Safety Diploma, and attends local networking events outside work hours for her own professional development.
  • • 
    Helps investigate incidents, and when she spots unsafe work practices while out for walks, on both council and non-council jobs, she always intervenes.

THE WINNER: JOANNE THOMPSON

The judges admired Joanne’s ability to spot an issue and, through her own determination, develop a successful intervention. In developing the new induction video she consulted widely, wrote the script, got staff involved, and achieved real cut-through with her message.

BUSINESS LEADERS’ HEALTH & SAFETY FORUM LEADER OF THE YEAR

THE FINALISTS:

RAY SMITH (CHIEF EXECUTIVE, DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS)

  • • 
    Influenced by a serious assault on a prison officer, he set up and chairs a risk governance group which has initiated major changes within Corrections.
  • • 
    Has helped drive the replacement of an ageing vehicle fleet with new vehicles, has obliged contractors to lift their safety game, and has equipped staff with stab-proof vests and on-body cameras.
  • • 
    Refashioned how H&S is managed and championed the introduction of structured risk tools and analysis.

ROGER GRAY (GROUP GENERAL MANAGER AIRPORTS, AIR NEW ZEALAND)

  • • 
    Always seeks to identify and remove obstacles to reducing risk, be it in championing ground handling equipment or improving how passengers leave aircraft on the tarmac.
  • • 
    Highly visible and accessible to all staff, and has championed senior leader participation in the accident review panel.
  • • 
    A transformational business leader with a safety mindset who has set the benchmark for how senior leaders at the airline approach health & safety.

VIV BULL (CULTURE AND CAPABILITY MANAGER, NAPIER PORT)

  • • 
    Has transformed the culture of the port by placing people at the centre and supporting their engagement and development, including in safety and wellbeing.
  • • 
    Developed the “Day in the Life” programme so port directors can work alongside staff on forklifts and cranes to experience risk and decision making at first hand.
  • • 
    Has championed women in a male-dominated sector and her expertise in safety and culture change is now sought from agencies beyond the port sector.

THE WINNER: RAY SMITH

The judges acknowledge Ray’s appointment by the State Services Commissioner as Government Health & Safety Lead as evidence of his success as a health & safety leader. His highly collaborative approach involving more than 30 public and state sector agencies seeks to transform the government sector into a leading force for better health & safety in New Zealand.

COUNTDOWN LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

SANDRA JOHNSTON

Sandra began work as an industrial chaplain more than 30 years ago. She trained with the Australian Critical Incident and Stress Association, and was involved in its transformation into a trans-Tasman body, known as Crisis Intervention Management Australasia (CIMA).

She went on to lead the creation of the national trauma network for Vitae.

After the 2011 Canterbury earthquake she organised Vitae’s trauma teams to work in Christchurch on rotation for 22 months, supporting USAR and coronial services among many others.

She worked at the coalface of this effort, alongside people from other trauma response groups, with only brief respites to return home to the Bay of Plenty.

Sandra is currently serving as president of CIMA and continues to train members of Vitae’s trauma network, as well as being a trauma responder on its national team.

This award acknowledges Sandra’s commitment over many years to the field of psychological trauma and supporting the mental health of people at work.

As well as helping to lead the development of trauma response in New Zealand, she has also been at the front line delivering services to working people over more than 20 years.

In doing so she has been a pioneer in highlighting the significance of mental health at work and has won recognition for the debilitating effects of trauma on health, long after the initial incident.

JUDGES’ SPECIAL COMMENDATION AWARD

YOUTHTOWN

Youthtown’s 100 staff and 200+ casual and volunteer workers deliver over half a million participation hours each year. It can be exhausting work which can lead to disengagement and even burnout.

In recognition of this, in 2017 Youthtown developed a unique wellbeing programme to promote staff engagement in initiatives designed to promote fairness, diversity and inclusion, and also to promote wellbeing at work and at home.

The programme uses gamification to encourage staff to complete monthly challenges and compare scores both individually and regionally.

The challenge programme is developed by staff for staff, and has resulted in significant engagement in challenges on a range of topics, including domestic violence training, walking meetings and mindfulness.

The judges acknowledge this effective approach to an unusually broad vision of wellbeing, which is well aligned with Youthtown’s four key values of Independence, Mastery, Belonging, and Generosity.

JUDGES’ SPECIAL COMMENDATION AWARD

NORTHPOWER

Staff feedback prompted the company to seek to better understand its people and how their work affects communities. Staff workshops arrived at four behaviours aligned with the company’s four values and came up with a whakatauki or proverb for each one.

The safety forum sought volunteers to design visual representations of each behaviour, and master carver Puhi Thompson recreated each design as whakairo, or wood carvings.

Roadshows were held to highlight the four behaviours, to share the story of how they came about, and to launch The Network Effect using videos and an online storytelling hub.

The judges applaud this highly consultative and collaborative approach to staff engagement, which has enabled people to better understand the importance of their collective role in the community and to share everyday stories which reinforce that kaupapa.

THE WORKSAFE NEW ZEALAND/ACC BEST OVERALL CONTRIBUTION TO IMPROVING WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY IN NEW ZEALAND.

UNITEC INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

In making this award the judges look for initiatives with the potential to transform health & safety performance beyond the needs of a single organisation. Unitec’s automated card reader system designs out risk and could be adopted by other organisations with large numbers of trainees requiring controlled access to dangerous machinery. Their initiative has been enthusiastically embraced by staff and students, and plans are under way to incorporate the access card into the Student ID card for even greater security.

PETER BATEMAN

comments powered by Disqus

From Safeguard Magazine

Table of Contents